Learning to Lament: God Speaks

The voices of pain, fear and anger speak loudly. As we journey through lament, we need to listen to and be reoriented by God’s voice. Thankfully, God not only sees and cares for us, but He speaks His words to our broken hearts. Since creation, God has been speaking life and hope and purpose. The written Word reveals Himself—through it we learn His character, His ways and His heart. But it’s not just information—God’s words are relational and purposeful. 

The practice of pouring out our hearts in humble complaint may feel like the easier and more familiar step, but an essential aspect of the lament process is tuning our hearts to hear and receive what God is saying to us. So what are some of the words that God speaks to those who are grieving?

  • God is near, and nothing can separate us from His love. Whatever our pain, He invites us to walk through it with Him. 
  • Just as God daily fed the Israelites with manna during their wilderness journey, He gives us grace and strength for today, and will give it again tomorrow. 
  • No other refuge is sufficient. In Him, we will find rest and joy and hope.
  • He loves what is good and hates what is evil.
  • God is still at work. His power is perfect, and His purposes will be accomplished. 
  • There is more beyond our suffering. We are invited into God’s eternal Kingdom reality, where our present pain is light and momentary compared with our future hope, which is secure and glorious.
  • The world is broken, and we are in need of grace—but He is a God of redemption, and He is making all things new. 

Learning to Lament: The Journey

“To cry is human, but to lament is Christian.” 

Mark Vroegop

It’s natural to want comfort when we’re hurting, so we tend to seek out other people as a sounding board where we rehearse our pain and receive their comfort and affirmation. We cry, we vent, we replay our suffering on an endless loop. For me, it’s so easy to get stuck in that place—the sadness feels all-consuming and it seems like there’s no way out. Now that I think about it, that’s probably why I often avoid acknowledging the sadness altogether—fear that it will swallow me, that I’ll never get out of the pit. 

However, grief is meant to be productive and active; it’s going somewhere. The destination of lament is not a feeling that things will turn out according to our definition of perfect, or a fake display of happiness. Our destination is trust in God as we move deeper into relationship with Him and lift our eyes to focus on His steadfast love and character. Lament leads us on a journey—from darkness to light, hopeless to resting.

The initial step in this journey is to turn to God in response to His invitation. The next element is what we normally think of as the central aspect of grief—crying out to God, pouring out our heart before the Lord. We acknowledge the pain, hurt, fears and frustrations, and we take them to Him. This crying out is very different from just venting though, because of who we’re talking to—God our Father who creates all things and yet knows, loves and cares about us individually. He is the God of all comfort, and we’re talking to Him in the context of relationship.

The journey continues on from there though, leading us to recall God’s character and faithfulness and look to Him for help and hope. By lifting our eyes up off of the pain and focusing on Him, our perspective can be reframed by truth. Like with a camera lens that’s been zoomed all the way in, we can widen the picture, refocus, and see the broader context of what we’re dealing with. Our small story is always happening within God’s grand narrative of redemption. As we continually turn to God and have our vision clarified by His presence, promises and purposes, we grow in trusting and resting in Him, which is where lament graciously leads us. Trust doesn’t mean everything is tied up in a bow—rather, it’s a reminder and persistent recognition that we are tethered to our good God. 

Lament isn’t a one-time linear process; it’s a road we’re going to be traveling as long as we sojourn in this broken world. But it isn’t stagnant; it’s active, moving us toward God and toward each other. 

These Things That Are Not Mine

I would gladly borrow Your knowledge, Lord, so that I could avoid dwelling in the tension of not knowing when this season will end. It feels like life is on hold, and we don’t know what will be left when this is all over. Will there be jobs, food, money? Will there be a future for us, and what will it hold? It seems like the hard things would be easier and more comfortable if we knew the expiration date, if we knew that peace and relief were on the way.

I would gladly borrow Your power in order to make this stop—to keep people from dying and going broke, to make life comfortable and predictable. To keep my friends and family safe, to make sure I’m protected and provided for, to fulfill my own plans and desires.

I would gladly borrow Your ability to be present everywhere. I miss my people, and I long to hold them close. Presence is such an undervalued gift, until we’re suddenly thrust into isolation, and we crave the togetherness that we often didn’t take time for before.

I want to borrow all these things, Lord, but I know that there’s a reason that they belong only to You. You are the One who holds all things together, and You are able to work in all things to accomplish Your purposes. Instead of clamoring for knowledge, help me to trust an unknown future to You my Father, the One who knows me, knows the story from beginning to end, and has made His perfect love fully known. Rather than grasping for control, help me to remember Your sovereignty and be humbly surrendered to You. Your ways are higher than mine, Your purposes are so much greater. Turn my heart to cherish and prioritize the spiritual over the temporal. And when I long to be present with the people I love, let me lift my eyes to You and choose to rejoice and be content with knowing that You are present with them, and that is the greater gift. You know their situations and their hearts. You alone are the God of Peace. May I come into Your presence each day and walk more closely with You, for in Your presence there is fullness of joy.

How an Eternal Perspective Shapes Our Present Living

Let’s face it – we are chronically self-focused. Our gaze is usually turned inward, and we evaluate and engage everything through the lens of personal impact. In seasons of suffering or bouts of difficult emotion, our vision is narrowed even more. But in Christ, our mind and heart are being transformed, renewed in the image of our Creator. A big piece of that sanctification process is growing in developing and nurturing an eternal perspective, so that our affections and purposes come into line with God’s. We need our lives to be shaped by God’s promises.

Eternal perspective has become a pervasive theme in what God has been teaching me lately. And the more I learn and grow, the more clearly I see how having an eternal perspective shapes every aspect of our present living. Here are just a few examples of areas that are impacted:

  • SUFFERING | We are given hope and comfort in the midst of suffering and grief. We are motivated to persevere and surrender.
  • FOCUS | We lift up our eyes and take the focus off ourselves. It cultivates a heart of humility.
  • SPIRITUAL GROWTH | We are motivated to know God more and walk with Him daily, and to put off sin and grow in sanctification.
  • PURPOSE | Our priorities are reoriented to focus on God’s purposes. We recognize that life is a gift to be stewarded rather than a competition to gain all we can.
  • WORK | It changes our perspective on work and ministry. Everything we do is fueled by the ministry of reconciliation that has been entrusted to us.
  • FEAR | In the face of anxiety, we are led to trust God and rest in the peace that He gives. This life is fleeting, and the pain and hurt is temporary. God is bigger than the things we fear, and we stand in reverent awe before Him.
  • IDENTITY | Our story is enveloped in God’s, and all glory goes to Him. He redefines and reframes our identity.
  • RELATIONSHIPS | We are motivated to pursue reconciliation in our relationships. We let go of offenses more quickly and remember that relationships are for Him, not for us.
  • LOVE | Our affections are loosed from earthly treasures, and our heart is fixed on our Father who has so abundantly loved us. We are devoted to Him above all else.

Seeing Through the Fog

“Fix your thoughts on what is true, and honorable, and right, and pure, and lovely, and admirable. Think about things that are excellent and worthy of praise.”  – Philippians 4:8

I’ve found that there are times when my mind can’t wrap itself around words. Maybe you’ve experienced this too. It usually happens when my emotions are especially strong, and I can’t see through the fog. I know I need to align my thoughts and feelings with what God says is true, but it’s hard to remember what I know and it’s hard to grasp the written Word.

How can you fix your eyes on the Lord when the words on the page aren’t communicating to your heart? How do you let truth pierce through the fog? One helpful tool is the many images that Scripture uses to describe God’s character and the ways He interacts with His people.

God is our refuge.

He is our firm foundation.

He is our Shepherd.

Jesus is the Bread of Life.

Christ is the Lamb of God who bears our sin and takes away our shame.

God is the Holy One on the throne.

He is the light to our path, the One who led His people by a pillar of fire.

Dwelling on these images can help fix your mind and heart on God’s character and promises. He is sovereign, strong, gracious, sufficient, loving, holy, and faithful. Even when the words aren’t sinking into your heart, seek to know Him and draw near.

“Oh, that we might know the LORD! Let us press on to know Him.”  – Hosea 6:3a

Reframing Your Story

Have you ever taken a photo and zoomed in really close, but later wished you had captured the entire scene? When people go through a period of suffering or intense emotion, or experience any kind of trauma, their thoughts and feelings are zoomed into the pain and it’s all they can see. Even once they are far-removed from the event, the memories often hold nothing but grief and heartache. Their vision is limited and they can feel completely paralyzed. The pain is in focus and everything else has been cropped out of the picture.

Unlike that photo, when it comes to your current or past experiences, you still have the option of changing the focus and reframing the story. Instead of keeping the pain front and center, zoom out and seek to view your story from God’s perspective. This doesn’t mean ignoring or dismissing the pain — just taking it out of focus so you can see the bigger picture.

The rest of the scene includes God’s character and how He displays His faithful love. In the midst of suffering, God promises His presence and comfort. He draws His children near in order to know Him more and experience His love in times of struggle. He is always good and He is always at work. Ask your loving Father to expand your vision and reframe your story by seeing it as part of His story. Then those memories won’t consume you with a flood of pain, but will inspire you to praise God and give thanks for His grace and faithfulness.

 

His bow is on the strings
And the tune resonates in the open space
To show us how emptiness sings:
Glory to God, Glory to God!
In fullness of wisdom,
He writes my story into his song,
My life for the glory of God.

 

-from “How Emptiness Sings” by Christa Wells